Energy profs equate Obama with more environmental regs

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New research from Enviance, an environmental ERP solutions provider, reveals that a significant amount of utilities do not have no emissions reporting system in place. Bu the research finds this will most likely change (either voluntarily or with the help of mandatory legislation) with the re-election of President Obama.

Enviance found that two-thirds of energy and utility industry professionals do not have a plan in place to manage the financial risk associated with the imposition of a cost on carbon, either through cap and trade or a tax. Last year, the annual research found that more than three-fifths of respondents thought the imposition of a carbon tax would impact their organization.

Nearly half of respondents with emission reporting requirements indicated that they had no actual reporting system in place and 33 percent of those who do have the systems are not currently using them.

More than three-fourths -- or 77 percent -- believe the re-election of President Obama will mean an increase in environmental regulations over the next four years.

"The fact that nearly half of those with emission reporting requirements have no actual reporting system in place may be best explained by a combination of election-year wishful thinking and a sputtering economic recovery. The re-election of President Obama, followed by his highlighting of climate in his inauguration speech, and a resurgent economy, assure that the drum beat of federal regulatory pressure on greenhouse gas emitters will continue and probably intensify," said Lawrence Goldenhersh, president and CEO of Enviance.  "In light of this momentum, companies without a compliance management system should consider implementing one to avoid an otherwise inevitable escalating spiral of risk and cost."

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